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Product Review - Corbin Flat Dual Sport Seat
Page 2 - Comparisons and Closer Inspection
Page 3 - Installation and Conclusions

 

 

 


Corbin Flat Dual Sport Seat for the Kawasaki KLR650 & 650 Tengai

Reviewed by Hondo Mar 21, 2007
Updated Aug 25,2007
 

Introduction


The Corbin Flat Seat - photo courtesy of Corbin Saddles


Today I'll be reviewing the Corbin Flat Dual Sport Seat for the KLR650 / 650 Tengai provided by Greg Hurley and Micheal Alva of Corbin Saddles.

Corbin's website information on the Corbin Flat Dual Sport Seat for the KLR650 is located HERE.

The online price direct from Corbin is $299.00 (as of 3-21-07)

Most KLR650 owners know that the stock seat leaves a lot to be desired as far as comfort is concerned. In my personal experience, I have found that I'm good for about a 45 minute ride before I need to get off the bike and give my backside a break. During that 45 minutes, I'm shifting around now & again to stay comfortable.


Hopefully the Corbin Flat seat will solve these issues.

Packaging

Here's what arrived at my doorstep-

The seat came in this box with a unique warning about knife use in opening the box.


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When I opened the box, this is what I saw- there's a seat in there somewhere!

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Wow - the seat was packed exceptionally well, using shaped foam on all sides to protect it in during shipping.

I removed the seat from the foam and found it nicely wrapped in a plastic bag, complete with a caution label about handling the seat.


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Inspection

Unwrapped, I sat the seat down for this view from above- looks wide & flat!

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The cover is constructed with two types of material- a black "Grabber Vinyl" for the seating area and the sides are a black "Asphalt Vinyl". My first impression upon touching the seat is that it feels like soft rubber. I don't anticipate a lot of slipping or sliding going on when riding. The Asphalt material on the sides compliments the Grabber Vinyl, with a nice luster to it.
Carefully flipping the seat over, I notice 2 things right away- NO staples used, and rubber frame bumpers instead of direct seat pan-to-frame contact. As you can see in the photo below, Corbin has chosen to use rivets to hold the cover to the Fibertech Basepan vs staples. This in and of itself speaks of quality, as it's much quicker to use staples (but not better ) in seat production.
The rubber bumpers also look like a big improvement over direct contact between the seat pan and the frame. Very nice!

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I also noticed a "Assembled by Jaime" label on the bottom- good job Jaime!

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Now onto some comparisons.......

 



 
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